Shop Matters - Ep. 25 Okuma & Mayfran: Clean Machines Make Efficient Machining

On this episode of Okuma’s Shop Matters podcast, host Wade Anderson sits down with Ben Bailey of Mayfran International to discuss how proper material handling and scrap removal can improve your efficiency and profitability.

TRANSCRIPTION

Wade Anderson:

Hey, manufacturing world. Welcome to another episode of Shop Matters, sponsored by Okuma America. I'm your host, Wade Anderson. And joining me in the studio today, I've got Ben Bailey from Mayfran. Welcome, Ben.

Ben Bailey:

Good to be here, Wade. I appreciate the invitation and the opportunity to sit down and have a good conversation with you.

Wade Anderson:

Yeah. So Ben traveled down from the Cleveland, Ohio area to be with us here in sunny Charlotte today. You couldn't ask for better weather. We got no clouds in the sky this morning here.

Ben Bailey:

No, no. It was pretty, pretty nice. I was just up in Minneapolis yesterday. Left, it was 55 degrees and got down here at 94.

Wade Anderson:

Yes, sir.

Ben Bailey:

Quite a little shock there but...

Wade Anderson:

Welcome to spring in the Carolinas. All right. So Ben, tell us a little bit about yourself and Mayfran International.

Ben Bailey:

Yeah. I've been with Mayfran for five years now. Actually, on June 6th will make my fifth year.

Wade Anderson:

Okay.

Ben Bailey:

I started as an application engineer in our machine tool products group. You're basically calling out the applications, the pricing and working closely with Okuma and Mazak and various other machine tool builders.

Wade Anderson:

Sure.

Ben Bailey:

Prior to that, I spent 18 years at a machine tool builder in Cleveland, Ohio named Bardons and Oliver. More of a custom bar feed type equipment. Raw material in, raw material out, worked as a machinist then worked my way into a more office role, worked in every department except accounting and then landed in sales. My last few years there. Then just timing. Decided to do something a little different and stay in the machine tool industry. And then here I am.

Wade Anderson:

Here you are. All right. Excellent. So for anybody that doesn't know, what does Mayfran do? What's your core product?

Ben Bailey:

Our core product is material handling. Scrap recovery, anything that has to do with the cutting fluids, the chips, stampings. There's two sides to the business. You have the machine tool products division, which is what we're here to talk about and then we have material handling systems, which are dedicated to automotive scrap like under the presses. You've got your body panels and such, again components, the structural components that get taken out. Well, they're under big presses, high volume scrap loads.

Ben Bailey:

We do filtration, large filtration from at the machine, like on the Okuma grinders. We have a low-profile version that's used. And then also two big centralized systems, typically tied to a chip processing system, which is the reclamation of the cutting fluids, dry chips. Anything you can do to look at your scrap, it's actually a revenue. You always want to look at how can you get maximum revenue, just like you get your maximum uptime on a machine.

Wade Anderson:

We've got customers that quote parts and their profit is actually in the chips. It's not in the part that they're making, it's actually the scrap and the chips. They're making the part that basically is covering their cost and then the profit they make is pucking and getting rid of the raw material afterwards.

Ben Bailey:

Yeah. A lot of it tied to the EPA too. You don't want to have anybody taking it to a scrap yard and dumping a bunch of coolant into the ground or wherever they do it. The next thing you know, you're going, "Ooh. We've got some water issues, water table issues and so on and so forth."

Wade Anderson:

Yeah. I know a company that used to do a lot of water jet machine work and the local water sewer department, or whatever you call that traced them back, and there was garnet getting dumped down the street gutters basically. Now they found this garnet, this material that was coming out of the water jets and traced it back to that company. It's not a good thing to happen.

Ben Bailey:

No, that's not. Not at all.

Wade Anderson:

All right. So to me, I think the chip conveyor aspect of machine tools, that's one of the unsung heroes of the manufacturing process. It's one of those things, almost like insurance. You don't think about it until you need it and then you're hoping you got the right policy. So I see this so many times with customers. They'll have spend mountains of time spreadsheeting machines and figuring out rapid travel rates and X, Y, Z travels and how much torque and horsepower and all the fun stuff that goes into specking out a machine. And they don't think anything about the chip conveyor until nine months after they've implemented it and realized, "Oh, we bought a machine with a standard hinge belt conveyor because it was the cheapest conveyor we could get. And now we've got tons of maintenance problems." So talk me through a little bit of that. I mean, what do you... I'm telling you what I see from the builder perspective. I mean, what's your experience?

Ben Bailey:

A lot of the same. You look at getting the scrap out, it's just a simple solution to get just the necessary evil of the machining process. But it plays a big role in the various other aspects of machine process, including the machine tool. Clean coolant. Understanding what clean coolant really means is part quality, surface finish, machine uptime, coolant clean out of your tanks, your sumps, things along those lines, making sure that you're getting those particulates out, so that mainly with high pressure coolant today and automation that's taking place with the cells, robotics, customized workholding, various other aspects that go along with it.

Ben Bailey:

Even just the human aspect of changing parts out in some instances. Having clean fixtures is critical. Another aspect of making sure why you need to have the clean coolant so on and so forth is you've got to be able to maintain the machine in itself--way covers, spindle closures and seals. So all the other things, ball screws, linear rails. Having that clean coolant is really, really important. And what we see is a customer will spec out a half a million dollar machine, and it's decked out with all these wonderful, wonderful tools, automatic tool probe setting, tool life monitoring, so on and so forth.

Ben Bailey:

The next thing you know, you've got problems with quality. You've got geometries you can't hold because you've got these particulates and chips and fines and so on and so forth between the workholding and the part, and the tool life is not what it was intended to be. So Mayfran, our expertise is understanding what you're going to be doing. That's the biggest, the most important question we need everyone to ask.

Ben Bailey:

What are you doing? What material? What part quality? Are you doing a roughing operation, a finishing operation or semi-finishing operation? What troubles have you seen in the past? We have the right solution for nearly every application.

Wade Anderson:

But we got to understand the application?

Ben Bailey:

Yes. Knowing that application is the core to success.

Wade Anderson:

I'll share an experience that I had in some of the service, and what I think is so super critical for any customer when you're looking at products. Obviously, I work for Okuma. I feel like we build one of the greatest machine tools in the market, but I'm also intelligent enough to know that you can take the top builders, put their name in a hat, pluck a name out of a bag. You can have a good machine, right? The service, the support, the infrastructure is what's really going to dictate how efficient, how profitable you're going to be, how successful you are with your process.

Wade Anderson:

So here, what's it been with the pandemic my timeframes get a little wonky, but I think it's been probably two years ago. I got a phone call from one of our distributors, and he said, "We're having some chip contamination problems. We don't have enough volume in the coolant tank. They want to hear from the OEM. I've got a representative, Jay, I believe that came down with me and we've got somebody from Mayfran coming in and they want somebody from Okuma to come in and we're going to have a little sit down powwow.

Wade Anderson:

Okay, fine. So we fly down, we meet, have a little pre-meeting, helped me understand the situation. He said, "We're just draining the clean tank. We need more coolant volume. We're going to build a separate coolant tank, an auxiliary tank, add more coolant to the system." On paper, that sounds reasonable enough. So we go in expecting to basically talk about that with the customer. I walk in and I'm looking just at their machine run and it's not really pumping out tremendous amounts of volume.

Wade Anderson:

I'm watching the shower coolant run. It's standard. I'm watching. I got a thousand PSI coolant. That's high pressure, but it's fairly low volume. So I'm watching this. I'm like, "Ah, something's not adding up here." So the cycle stops and it was on a horizontal. The pallet changes. So I walked back, I'm watching the coolant tank. All the levels were about right. It starts running. And immediately you start seeing the clean tank start draining. Then I'm watching the dirty coolant come in, raise up and overflow into everything.

Wade Anderson:

I'm like, "Whoa, whoa, whoa. We're not getting through the filter. This isn't a volume problem, it's a capacity problem on where your coolant is. You've got enough coolant in the system. It's not getting through the filters correctly. And what it was, the type of material that they were cutting. They were cutting all aluminum, high volume aluminum creating just a real nasty-

Ben Bailey:

Fine, fine chip needle like.

Wade Anderson:

Yeah. And it wasn't just the fines. Everybody gets fines with aluminum, but the type of machining they were doing, it was like needles. So the filter that was on the particular conveyor was just jamming up like you just shot a bunch of darts on dark board, and then all the fines were collecting on top of those needles, and none of the coolant was able to get through. I hated to do this with the customer walking out. I'm like, "What we were going to propose isn't the right thing. We need a different chip conveyor." He's like, "What are you talking about? We just bought all these machines. And it's a great chip conveyor that you guys built." But for his application, it was the wrong one.

Ben Bailey:

It wasn't working.

Wade Anderson:

All of a sudden, I'm the bad guy that's got to break that news to him like, "Man, I hate to tell you this, but this conveyor is not going to do what you need it to do." So we backed up, we went to the original ConSep 2000, which is something I want you to kind of talk through. We went to the original twin belt ConSep 2000. Everything just night and day difference in the entire process and the cleanliness that came afterwards.

Wade Anderson:

So that was an eye-opener for me to realize, wow, what a difference this can make by having what you might've thought was a good conveyor versus what is truly the right conveyor for the right application.

Ben Bailey:

Absolutely.

Wade Anderson:

So talk through a little bit of the different models of chip conveyors that you would typically see on a machining center for an exam.

Ben Bailey:

Yeah. On a machining center, you're typically going to be running all kinds of different jobs. The most common will be a job shop. So again, going back to understanding what are you going to do and what do you think you're going to do in the future and you planning for the future?

Wade Anderson:

That's a great point.

Ben Bailey:

It is because things change. The job shop world is constantly evolving. Customers come, go, capacity up, down, so on and so forth. One of the things that the ConSep 2000 brought to the table was it was designed in 1995. That was when it rolled out. It was, and still is the leader in the chip handling and separator conveyor markets. 25 years later, it still does what it needs to do and it gets you down to that 50 micron level, which is about three thousandths nominal in particulate size.

Wade Anderson:

So let's describe for anybody, and I know a lot of people, as soon as you say ConSep 2000 I know exactly in my mind what it looks like, but for anybody that doesn't, explain what a ConSep 2000 is.

Ben Bailey:

ConSep 2000 is essentially two conveyors. On the very top, you have a standard hinge belt conveyor, and that's there to pull out the heavy metal removal rates that you typically see in an aluminum where you're starting out from a solid. So you're just gripping and ripping, getting it off as quickly as possible. Well, on the top side, that's what that conveyor's purpose serves is get the chips out.

Ben Bailey:

It's offset to the center line of the bottom conveyor, which is where the magic takes place. That is the separator aspect of the conveyor. So down below, we have the ConSep 1000 basically, and it's great. It's a scraper type conveyor with a drum filter in the center or at the incline area.

Wade Anderson:

Yeah. So that's a permanent media drum filter.

Ben Bailey:

It's a permanent media. Self-cleaning, has a spray bar system, a backwash pump. So as the dirty coolant flows, it flows through the drum filter. And then the clean coolant goes, obviously through the inside and goes out either both sides or one side, depending on where your clean tank is within the actual tank itself. Once that takes place, we then pump it up right into your machine tool. Or some cases, some further coolant polishing needs to be done. The beauty of what it brings to the table is, again, it takes it down to three thousandths or 50 micron.

Ben Bailey:

As you described, there are applications where these needle-like chips are just you get these high helix end mills and they're taking the cut and they're holding very tight tolerances. The chips are real difficult to keep out of the system. So we've developed another permanent media that is interchangeable. It can get you down to 25 micron. And what that does is it's a dual weave screen.

Ben Bailey:

So those little needles, they don't go straight through. It's like going through a chain link fence. Yeah so to speak. It's overlapped, so your openings are smaller. What that brings is, at that point, you can handle those smaller chips and get that 25 micron going through there. We do need to know a lot about that application because the finer you clean coolant, you get some coolant flow restrictions.

Ben Bailey:

So understanding how much flood coolant, what your GPM is full on, all pumps running. Because those are conditions that you've got to plan for. Sump depth. As you indicated, you've got those problems that the one customer you went to. They were overflowing. Well, you turn on all those pumps, you start starving the system. You shut it off and you get this immediate rush of all of that coolant coming back into the system. And making sure that you have the capacity within there.

Ben Bailey:

We've had customers add some pumps. Well, adding a pump is great, but do we have the capacity?

Wade Anderson:

You're pulling away.

Ben Bailey:

You're pulling more away. Can you collect it as quickly as you need to? So again, going back to just understanding what that application is and how can we help you identify the right solution. The ConSep is really the industry leader with, again, the dual belt, the separator conveyor down at the bottom and there's other accessories that can go along with it that gets you even further cleanliness.

Wade Anderson:

So tell me about the ConSep Mark II, the ConSep 2000II.

Ben Bailey:

Yes. Mark II was designed shortly after the ConSep 2000 and designed specifically for those smaller machine tools that you don't have the height underneath the casting to get it to fit in there. So it's a single belt version.

Wade Anderson:

So that's one good point. The original ConSep 2000, that's a pretty tall-

Ben Bailey:

It's a tall unit.

Wade Anderson:

Or thick conveyor. I don't know how to describe that best, but because there's literally two conveyors in this, it's much taller. You got to have a little more clearance on the machine to be able to get that in.

Ben Bailey:

Absolutely. The Mark II provides a single belt version of it. So you've got the lower profile you can fit down inside the tank. You don't have to lift the machine. You don't want to bring the machine up off the floor very high. You know what that does. The vibrations are now amplified, which impacts part quality, so on and so forth. But being able to fit in there in a standard height of a basic conveyor and bring all the same benefits that you have with a ConSep 2000, that was the game changer in that world too.

Wade Anderson:

Right. Okay. So what other conveyor products would you talk about? So obviously a standard hinge belt conveyor. That's just a normal, just as it describes, right? There's no filtration, things of that nature. But then do you have an intermediate to go from that to the ConSep? What does that look like?

Ben Bailey:

Yeah. We have an intermediate conveyor that is called the CleanSweep, CleanSweep-RM, and the RM represents reduced maintenance. So with a basic hinge belt conveyor, 1,000 micron particulate will get through the belt and into your tank. Well, if you're running cast iron, for example, or even aluminum, you're going to get those fines and they collect inside the tank. They take away from coolant volume. They require you to clean out the tank more frequently.

Ben Bailey:

Well, in a mid-range conveyor, what that brings is the ability to do some filtering. If you look at the good, better, best, the good is the conveyor, basic hinge belt conveyor. The better is the CleanSweep. The best would be ConSep and even some other versions of other conveyors we make. But the filtering capability allows you to get reduced maintenance within your coolant tank.

Ben Bailey:

You don't have to clean out the coolant tank. We've had customers that will have to clean their coolant tank once a month. Changing out your cooling tank, there's a lot more to just, "okay, I'm going to pull it out. I'm going to take it out of service. I'm going to clean it." Well, if you really add up all of those expenses and labor and lost up time, so on, that are tied to all of that, you can be upwards of $3,500 each time you do that. You do that on once a month.

Ben Bailey:

Well, the CleanSweep, you've got the basic which is your lowest cost conveyor. Then you have a mid-range. The mid-range is going to be in the middle because the ConSep is not an inexpensive conveyor. It's a machine in itself, and a lot of people got to understand that. But the CleanSweep looks just like a regular hinge belt conveyor, but the coolant will flow through the belt, and there's a filter box inside there. And the coolant will run through the filter. It's got a self-cleaning, patented design on the underside of the belt. It constantly keeps the filter panel clean with a scraper and a brush, and a wiper.

Ben Bailey:

So we're always cleaning that filter panel, so we don't get any buildup or you get your perforations clogged. And we then take the chips out conventionally. You wouldn't know any different other than when you look at it and you see the big chips coming out at one end and this real small, fine particulates coming out through this little screw auger.

Ben Bailey:

So we're at the bottom side. Underneath the belt, there's an inner pan and it scrapes, and then it drops into a little auger. So the fine particulates get screwed out with the auger and drop in one spot. And the normal chips that get carried out on the top side of the belt, they drop six, eight inches, and it looks like a normal conveyor. It looks a little different, exact same profile, exact same footprint as a hinge belt conveyor. And really just in the middle of the road.

Ben Bailey:

A lot of it is you got to be careful of your machine tool, capital expenditure. There's usually a percentage you want to stay within when you're looking at a conveyor. If you're buying a $200,000 machine, you don't want to buy... You may not need or want to spend $30,000 on a conveyor that does everything and anything you would ever need, but you're looking for something that'll just do the job and save you time and effort in maintaining that coolant.

Wade Anderson:

Yeah, okay. So talk about some of the new products. What new and exciting things has Mayfran have coming down the pipeline?

Ben Bailey:

Yeah. That's funny you mentioned that because next month in July, we're going to be introducing the next generation. We call it the G2, the CleanSweep-G2. It is the next generation of the CleanSweep-RM, which is what we were just talking about. The G2 does a lot of different things that what we've done in the past, or capability-wise, as the CleanSweep-RM. One of the bigger things that it brings to the tables we have higher coolant flows.

Ben Bailey:

So historically, we've tried to stay away from machining centers with the CleanSweep because we're limited on coolant flow. When you get all that flood coolant, high pressure, wash down, you can pump 60, 70 gallons per minute. And that's quite a high volume of coolant. Well, depending on the length of the conveyor, we have these filter panels and you were really limited if you just short lower horizontal, is what we call what goes up and inside the machine, you couldn't get the flow through it.

Ben Bailey:

Well, we designed a whole new conveyor. It's a very, very unique conveyor, a belt design we've never done before. I don't think the industry has ever seen anything like this before. It will bring a lot more benefits than what the CleanSweep-RM brought to the industry. We can do 150 micron.

Wade Anderson:

Wow, okay.

Ben Bailey:

We can handle very high coolant flows, very high chip load. One of the real game changers we feel with this unit is you can do a CleanSweep-G2 prep. So you start off buying a basic conveyor.

Wade Anderson:

Like a hinge belt?

Ben Bailey:

Like a hinge belt. Your application changes, but you bought the CleanSweep-G2 prep conveyor. And it's very comparably priced as what you would see in a hinge belt conveyor. Your application changes. Now, you've got coolant and product building up inside or particulate building up inside of your tanks. Well, it's the G2 prep conveyor. We can convert you over to a true G2 conveyor, get you to that 150 micron level of filtration, provide the same coolant flows that you experienced if you have a high coolant flow. And instead of replacing the whole conveyor, which can be quite costly, it's a very comparable upgrade to what it would cost to actually buy the CleanSweep and have the right conveyor. So again, it gives you that flexibility of it started with this, and now we're here. We've got problems. Here's an inexpensive...

Wade Anderson:

You can expand the technology basically.

Ben Bailey:

A quick solution to the problem.

Wade Anderson:

Very nice. When is that going to be available?

Ben Bailey:

We are going to be rolling it out here in July 2021.

Wade Anderson:

Very nice.

Ben Bailey:

There'll be some pretty exciting things coming about with that, with social media, just literature, and advertising.

Wade Anderson:

Sure.

Ben Bailey:

Getting it out, coming and meeting with you and your staff so they understand what this brings to them and simplifies their sales process and gives them a solution just like your equipment does.

Wade Anderson:

Right. Very nice. Say I'm a customer. I'm looking at buying a new piece of equipment. What's the steps I need to go through to make sure I'm getting the right conveyor for the right manufacturing process?

Ben Bailey:

If you're looking at this, understand what is the part that you're machining? What is the material that you're machining? What do you feel you need? Talk to your other accessory people, the high-pressure personnel, those guys that do that. Mist collection. All the different things that come into it. What type of tools are you using? What process is it going to be? Learn and understand what that is as the sales guy to come back and make sure that your engineering group understands what they need to propose.

Ben Bailey:

You can always give the good, better, best, but they've got to understand that there are differences. We have a nice tool that we have a conveyor comparison guide. You look at the chips, it tells you, here's a good solution. Here's the better, here's this based on the material type and the different types of conveyors.

Wade Anderson:

That's almost like the law of economy. Right? You've got tradeoffs to everything. So there's good, better, best, and there's pros and cons to what you're going to trade off as you go up and down that scale.

Ben Bailey:

Yeah.

Wade Anderson:

Very good. What about filtration? I think we've done some stuff in the past with cyclonic filtration type devices, things like that. What type of products does Mayfran bring to the table from that aspect?

Ben Bailey:

When you're buying a machine tool and you're buying the conveyor and you have the right conveyor, maybe your application has changed and you need cleaner coolant. For example, you're running cast iron. That's always a tough one. That's always a nasty, nasty material. Nice parts. But, boy, I tell you, there's a lot of nastiness that comes with that material with the silica and the graphite.

Wade Anderson:

Back in the early '90s, I worked for Holset Turbo down in Charleston, South Carolina. We had horizontal machining centers. About once every three months or so, we would have to pull the tanks out, sump them out. I would literally have to take chisels and we would chisel all that cast iron, because it would start collecting in corners and things like that and build up. Now, there's things that we do with flow to reduce that. But still, the cast iron is just terrible from that aspect.

Ben Bailey:

Yeah. It's a nasty material. It's a necessary evil of the industry though. We have a lot of cast iron in a lot of different products.

Wade Anderson:

Absolutely.

Ben Bailey:

We have a product called the MagSep, and it's a magnetic bed conveyor. It's a drag conveyor. So typically with cast iron, you don't get a large chip. It's a very small chip. It's very granular and it's heavy because it's ferr. So it'll drop. So we use the magnetic bed to pull it out. The magnetic bed comes out of the coolant, so we don't lose or re-suspend the chips as it comes out. Another advantage to that is a lot of times you want even further cleaner coolant, and it just isn't on the MagSep conveyor. It's also on any of the other conveyors, ConSeps.

Ben Bailey:

What we have is the AT-Cleaner cyclonic filtration. So we're using a cyclone where the dirty coolant comes in and it spins. So it goes to the outside and then drops. It drops back onto the belt and we carry it out. The clean coolant goes right to the clean side of the tank or to an ultra-clean tank, which then typically gets fed right into the high-pressure coolant system.

Ben Bailey:

So there's a lot of advantages to that because when you're running that cast iron product, you're getting all of those fine particulates in your high pressure coolant filtration, which is typically a canister filter has to separate all of that. So you go through quite a few of those whether they're bag filters or cartridge filters, and that adds up.

Ben Bailey:

You might have two, a primary and a secondary, so you're not losing any uptime, but it can be timely, especially in a lights-out application if someone had forgotten to change out a cartridge filter and it goes into a fault mode, or you start starving. The AT-Cleaner will clean you down to 10 micron. It's got to be a water-soluble coolant. It does not work in oil because oil is a very thick viscosity.

Ben Bailey:

You can't get that separation through the spinning process, like a tornado, vortex. So in a lot of cases, it's a great solution to get you further down. And one of the nice advantages is we have a package that can mount right to the incline of the conveyor. You have to add a pump. Usually, you have a pump riser there available. Make sure that the machine has the capability of the right relay and amperage draws for that pump. It's not a high hydraulic pump just enough to get it moving and pump it through.

Ben Bailey:

But you don't have to set it on the floor as a separate unit taking up floor space. You take off the cover of the incline, you mount this on, you run some plumbing, plug it in and start going.

Wade Anderson:

Nice. Okay. So stays in the same real estate of what you already have.

Ben Bailey:

It stays in the same real estate.

Wade Anderson:

So one of the newer products that's really kind of come to market here in the last, let's just say four or five years or so, is really the advancement from an additive manufacturing standpoint. A lot of machine tool builders, us included, we build our LASER EX Series where we're running powdered metal through a laser deposition process to build material on the parts. Are you guys doing anything in that environment?

Ben Bailey:

Yeah. We've gotten more and more involved with that being that it is a powdered base and you don't have the typical, normal chip formation you would see with the additive manufacturing. You get these powders that get into your cutting fluids because you've still have to machine the part after you've added the secondary material.

Wade Anderson:

Yeah. That's the whole kind of point is that hybrid atmosphere. We can repair, mold and die work, fix cracks, things of that nature, and then machine it back down in one workholding.

Ben Bailey:

Yep. And what we do in that application is we can still incorporate a ConSep or any other conveyor type that would be best suited for the application. But you really need to get that coolant further cleaner. And that's where a permanent separation is needed whether it's a deep bed gravity filter, a low-profile, a vacuum filter, a pressure filter. Mayfran builds all of that type of equipment, whether it's at the machine or centralized. You've got multiple machines tied to it.

Ben Bailey:

You can separate that permanently because the paper takes it out with a paper filter, and different types of papers will get you the different types of filtration, just like you see with a ConSep 2000. It gets you the 50 micron. Well, we can get you further cleaner than that with paper filters. And it takes that powder out so that when you run that back through, those types of powders and stuff are very abrasive. And they have a huge impact on all of the above with the machines as we talked earlier with reliability.

Wade Anderson:

Yeah, excellent. So, Ben, I appreciate your time today. If people want to learn more about Mayfran or any of your products, what's the best way to get in touch with you?

Ben Bailey:

You can call us at our Cleveland headquarters at 440-461-4100, or you can go to our website. That's our salesperson who is there 24 hours, seven days a week at www.mayfran.com.

Wade Anderson:

All right. Excellent. Well, I appreciate all the knowledge and everything you shared with us today and look forward to working with you more in the future here.

Ben Bailey:

Yeah. We really appreciate you inviting us to this, and myself particularly. It was a really cool experience. I never done a podcast before.

Wade Anderson:

Excellent. Well, I appreciate you being part of it. And thank you all for listening. If you have any thoughts, comments, or questions, ideas for future podcasts, feel free to reach out to me. You can find me on LinkedIn or reach out to me on my email address, wanderson@okuma.com and be sure to look for other podcasts, videos, and other Okuma content at www.okuma.com. Until next time, we'll see you then.

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